Arnhem: The Battle for the Bridges, 1944

“Antony Beevor, using many overlooked and new sources from Dutch, British, American, Polish and German archives, has reconstructed the terrible reality of this epic clash. Yet this book, written in Beevor's inimitable and gripping narrative style, is about much more than a single dramatic battle. It looks into the very heart of war.”
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Synopsis

On 17 September 1944, General Kurt Student, the founder of Nazi Germany’s parachute forces, heard the growing roar of aero engines. He went out on to his balcony above the flat landscape of southern Holland to watch the vast air armada of Dakotas and gliders, carrying the British 1st Airborne and the American 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions. He gazed up in envy at the greatest demonstration of paratroop power ever seen.

Operation Market Garden, the plan to end the war by capturing the bridges leading to the Lower Rhine and beyond, was a bold concept: the Americans thought it unusually bold for Field Marshal Montgomery. But the cost of failure was horrendous, above all for the Dutch who risked everything to help. German reprisals were cruel and lasted until the end of the war.

The British fascination for heroic failure has clouded the story of Arnhem in myths, not least that victory was possible when in fact the plan imposed by Montgomery and General ‘Boy’ Browning was doomed from the start.

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Reviews
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“It is, in short, a chapter of the Second World War that was crying out for the storytelling talents of Sir Antony Beevor, arguably the finest narrative historian of his generation. This is the result – and his many fans will not be disappointed. . . Beevor’s particular skill is his ability to unearth new sources that articulate the experience of war felt by ordinary people: soldiers and civilians, men and women. . . Beevor has produced another superb book, tirelessly researched and beautifully written, that will long be the benchmark for this subject.” Saul David, The Daily Telegraph
“Antony Beevor’s account is, as you would expect from this master-narrator, completely gripping; the story is played out day by day, sometimes hour by hour, but always with one eye on the strategic thinking (or lack of it) and the key causal factors involved. . . This is a much more rounded account than than any that have appeared so far.” Noel Malcolm, The Sunday Telegraph
“Beevor describes the battle and its aftermath with his customary deep understanding of the human factor – both of the soldiers who risked everything and of the plight of the Dutch civilians.” General Mike Jackson, The Spectator
“Antony Beevor’s magnificent account. . . Beevor’s skill lies in his ability to recreate the tumultuous brutality of battle. . . With stark honesty, Beevor describes the terrible panoply.” Gerard De Groot, The Times
“Another masterwork from the most feted military historian of our time. . . Does the story need to be retold? Beevor is such a good writer, with a gift for clarity and a knack for the telling personal portrait, that the answer is undoubtedly yes.” Jay Elwes, Prospect
“Beevor tells a story that is more human and complex than what he calls “the great myth of heroic failure”, a tale of vanity, hubris, occasional incompetence, human frailty and remarkable grit. . . In Beevor’s hands, Arnhem becomes a study of national character” Ben Macintyre, The Times
“The analysis he has produced of the disaster is forensic. Aficionados of military history will revel in Beevor’s microscopic detail, with every skirmish given its rightful place. . . Beevor’s prodigious research has nevertheless unearthed many treasures, particularly his record of the sufferings of Dutch civilians who risked their necks by nursing wounded allied soldiers.” Giles Milton, The Sunday Times
“Complete mastery of both the story and the sources. The beauty is in the details. . . . This gripping book, with its tightly focused timescale and subject matter, shows him once again at his very best.” Keith Lowe, Literary Review
“Our greatest chronicler of the Second World War . . . The drama of manoeuvre and counter-thrust, the courage and cowardice of soldiers civilian, the follies and vanities of commanders, which are especially rich in this story, are deployed with colour and humanity. His fans will love it” Robert Fox, The Evening Standard
“This absorbing new account of the battle with the eye for telling detail which we have come to expect from Antony Beevor. . . this time, though, he turns his brilliance as a military historian to a subject not just of defeat, but dunderhead stupidity.” Daily Mail
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Publishers
United Kingdom Viking Penguin